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More rubbish from the Daily Mail

Five Chinese Crackers has a great analysis (exposé?) of one of the Daily Mail’s endless ‘political correctness gone mad’ articles. Well worth reading… and pretty hilarious. Click!

This 1,034th post was filed under: Media.

Daily Mail’s biggest non-story yet?

Everybody knows that the Daily Mail loves nothing more than to print anti-BBC stories. But really, this latest attempt breaks new ground, even for the Mail.

The story is that the presenter of the BBC’s flagship news bulletin, Huw Edwards, was wearing a poppy which fell off just before the programme went to air. So in the first report, he picked it up and reattached it. Fascinating stuff.

In the world of the Daily Mail, though:

When BBC Ten O’Clock news presenter Huw Edwards took to the news-room floor during Monday night’s bulletin – viewers were immediately alerted to the fact that he has forgotten something – his poppy. Viewers were doubly confused when the poppy suddenly appeared on Edwards jacket after the broadcaster cut away to an interview with its top political correspondent Nick Robinson some way into the show.

Terribly confusing for all concerned, I’m sure. But far from jumping to the obvious conclusion, Daily Mail readers

could have been forgiven for thinking that the PC brigade were at it again

Somehow, the Mail then draws a connection between a poppy falling off someone’s jacket, and the fact that the Beeb have decided that ‘distracting’ religious symbols might not be the best idea on a newsreader – or, in the world of the Daily Mail, banned Fiona Bruce from wearing a cross. Which, incidentally, was blatantly untrue.

How on Earth does something this stupid make the pages of a national newspaper? It’s astonishing, even from the Daily Mail.

But my favourite bit of the article is this:

The poppy incident marked an eventual [sic] night for the Welsh news-reader after it was revealed that a contagious eye infection almost caused him to miss his broadcast.

Eventual?

This 987th post was filed under: Media, News and Comment.

Why Daily Mail readers are so paranoid

From last week’s Friday Thing:

‘A third of the population regularly suffer paranoid or suspicious fears that others intend to harm them, say researchers,’ reported the Daily Mail this week. Apparently psychologists at King’s College London have found that a worryingly large proportion of people believe others intend to do them harm or are criticising them behind their backs. The research suggests that paranoia could be as widespread as depression or anxiety.

Exactly why we’re all so paranoid isn’t clear, but one explanation could well be: ‘It’s because you’re reading the Daily fucking Mail.’

The *same* edition contained the following headlines:

– Will Britons be forced to eat hormone injected beef?

– Security bosses keep terror watch on 1,200 homegrown fanatics

– Schoolgirls’ websites make them prey for paedophiles

– Migrant housing cheats

– Child protection police chief ‘throttled girls’

– The freak accident that left my son obsessed with sex

– You’re eating the WRONG fruit and veg

– IS YOUR X-RAY SAFE?

– TRAPPED IN HER BED FOR 14 YEARS

And, perhaps best of all:

– Is going to the gym BAD for your health? – Lurking on the dumbells. Hidden in the towels. The millions of killer bacteria festering in your gym.’

Yes, millions of deadly bacteria, all waiting to get you, like microscopic Viet Cong. It’s a miracle that regular Daily Mail readers don’t just kill themselves and have done – blissful release from a world of fear and loathing. Or maybe they’re happier that way. As Sparks so eloquently put it: ‘My parents say the world is cruel. I think that they prefer it cruel.’

It’s worth mentioning, too, that for the last little while, The Friday Thing has been free… I’ve always said it was worth signing up for – and that’s true now more than ever!

This 898th post was filed under: Media.




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